HOBO SPIDER

HOBO SPIDER

The Hobo Spider, also known as the aggressive house spider (AHS), is sometimes mistaken for a brown recluse because of similarity in color.

How do I identify a hobo spider?
Unlike other spiders, these don’t have bands of colors and in the middle of the abdomen there are V shapes pointed toward the head. These creatures enjoy being secluded in their funnel type web waiting for their prey such as flies, beetles, silverfish and cockroaches. They do look for warmer temperatures when the seasons change. This is when people may see them inside of their home. Lack of climbing ability forces these spiders to dine on whatever is on ground level. The only time these spiders will come out of hiding is for mating purposes, where the female spider will immediately kill the male when finished.

What are the dangers of a hobo spider?
Firstly, don’t panic if you see a hobo spider heading your way; they have poor vision and might not know they are even heading toward a person. Do keep in mind that they are very poisonous and aggressive. These arachnids are extremely hostile when it comes to their young and will attack you if they feel their eggs are threatened in any way. Most bites occur from a spider being inside of an article of clothing before you put it on, and it reacts when it feels the pressure of being between you and the clothing.

What happens if I am bitten?
Immediately see a doctor. Within the first 24 hours, it looks as innocent as a mosquito bite but begins to form a blister in the center, soon after breaking open leaving an unsightly oozing hole. In some cases, the flesh around the wound will begin to decompose which can progress quickly. A person with a spider bite should have already sought out a doctor’s help, but if you reach a point where your skin begins to decay, go to the hospital immediately. Anti-venom might be injected to control potential spreading. Symptoms from bite include headache, fatigue, weakness, nausea and temporary memory loss & vision impairment.